Georgia Candy Roaster

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nice small banana-type squash from Appalachia. Typical fruits weigh 10 pounds and have a distinctive greenish-blue blossom end mark. Very rare. Smooth, delicious orange flesh, perfect for baking, frying and making pies.

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Georgia Candy Roaster Squash History

(Cucurbita maxima) A nice small banana-type squash from Appalachia. Typical fruits weigh 10 pounds and have a distinctive greenish-blue blossom end mark. Very rare. Smooth, delicious orange flesh, perfect for baking, frying and making pies.

Growing North Georgia Candy Roaster

start summer and winter squashes indoors 3–4 weeks before the last frost. Sow squash outdoors or set out seedlings when the soil temperature reaches 70ºF. Sow seed ½ inch–1 inch deep. Thin successful plants to 36 inches apart in all directions. Sow 4–5 seeds 2–3 inches deep, 3–4 inches apart in hills raised 12 inches spaced 6 or more feet apart. Thin to 2 successful plants per hill.

Preserving And Storing Georgia Candy Roaster

Summer squash is good for you. It is low in calories and many varieties provide vitamin C, potassium and, if the skin is eaten, beta carotene. Preserve summer squash by freezing, pickle them for canning or dry them.

When To Harvest Georgia Candy Roaster

squash is ready to harvest when the skin hardens. Press your fingernail through the flesh. If you have to work at it, the squash is ripe; if it’s very easy to pierce, the squash is immature. The skin should be full, firm, and rich in color without blemishes or cracks or soft spots. The stem should be dry and firm.

Squash Recipes

Like many of its cousin squash varieties, the candy roaster doesn’t need much dressing up—it’s best served simply, deeply roasted with a few pops of texture and contrasting flavor. Squash is beloved for its sweet-meets-savory flavor, and we play on both palates in this recipe, drizzling the squash in syrupy sorghum to help it achieve caramelization and draw out those sweeter notes.

Georgia Candy Roaster Nutrition

squash is low in calories but high in many nutrients, including vitamin A, vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium. It is an excellent source of provitamin A carotenoids, vitamin C, B vitamins, potassium, magnesium, and manganese. The high antioxidant content of squash may reduce your risk of certain conditions, including heart disease, lung cancer, and mental decline. squash is low in calories and packed with fiber — making it a great choice for any healthy weight loss plan.

Other Squash Varieties Worth Checking Out

Early Summer Crookneck Squash The Early Summer Crookneck Squash Is one of the oldest documented varieties of squash, said to have been given to colonial gardeners in the early 1700’s from the native Lenape people of the Delaware valley. Very popular with home and market gardeners alike.

Waltham Butternut Squash Waltham Butternut Squash was developed and introduced by Bob Young of Waltham, Massachusetts. Most popular variety of butternut, vigorous, highly productive plants. Fruits weight 3-6 pounds and have rich, orange flesh with a nice nutty flavor. All American Selections winner in 1970.

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